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The autumn winds have brought down the lurid, neon-green, curiously wrinkled fruits of the Osage orange...
The autumn winds have brought down the lurid, neon-green, curiously wrinkled fruits of the Osage orange...
 

Gardening Club cast their vote for best young people's science book

Young people from Gardening Club at CUBG will help choose the winner of this year’s Royal Society Young People’s Book Prize, one of the world’s most prestigious awards for science writing.
Daniel works his way through the Royal Society Young People’s Book Prize shortlist in the Schools' GardenDaniel works his way through the Royal Society Young People’s Book Prize shortlist in the Schools' Garden
As part of an innovative judging process, the winner will be selected entirely by the young people themselves from a shortlist put together with the help of an expert adult panel of educationalists and scientists.

The young people from Gardening Club at CUBG will be among over one thousand children from schools and youth groups across the UK who are helping to choose the winning science book. As one of the judging panels, Gardening Club is spending this half term reading, reviewing and debating all six books on the shortlist before agreeing a favourite to receive the winning vote. The votes are then collated by the Royal Society and the book with the most votes will win the prize.

Robert, a member of Gardening Club’s judging panel said: 'I really love books and science so having to judge these books is really interesting. It’s quite hard work trying to make a decision all together about which book we liked best.' You can listen to the views of the Gardening Club voting panel by clicking on the link right.

Professor Michael Lockwood FRS, Chair of this year’s judges, who selected the shortlist, said: "These books cover a huge range of science - from the science of the human body to the stunning story of the universe - but they all have one thing in common, making science exciting, fun and accessible to younger readers. We can't wait to see what the real experts - the young people who will be choosing the winner - make of them."

The Royal Society Young People’s Book Prize celebrates the very best in science writing for children and young adults and is worth £10,000 to the winning author and £1,000 to the author of each shortlisted title. The winner of the Royal Society Young People’s Book Prize will be announced towards the end of the year.

The Royal Society Young People’s Book Prize did not take place in 2008 - 2010 due to funding issues but has been re-established in 2011 thanks to the generosity of an anonymous donor.

The six books shortlisted for this year's Royal Society Young People's Book Prize are:

• The Icky Sticky Blood and Snot Book by Steve Alton and Nick Sharratt (Bodley Head)
• What's the Point of Being Green? by Jacqui Bailey (Franklin Watts)
• How the World Works by Christiane Dorion and illustrated by Beverly Young (Templar Publishing)
• What Mr Darwin Saw by Mick Manning and Brita Granström (Frances Lincoln Children's Books)
• The Story of Astronomy and Space Published by Usborne
• What Goes On In My Head by Robert Winston (Dorling Kindersley)
Publication Date
27/09/2011