Looking good now
Through the Woodland and on the Systematic Beds, hoops of orange and yellow crown imperial bells sporting a tuft of bright green leaves are standing in joyful crowds.
Through the Woodland and on the Systematic Beds, hoops of orange and yellow crown imperial bells sporting a tuft of bright green leaves are standing in joyful crowds.
 
Testing how bees differentiate between petal surface texturesTesting how bees differentiate between petal surface textures

Research

Ever since its foundation, the Cambridge University Botanic Garden has been a focus and stimulus for science in the University. For example, it was here in 1901 that William Bateson carried out his genetic research and proclaimed Mendel and the new science of genetics to the English-speaking world.

The research collections, facilities and horticultural expertise are provided for any member of the University, whatever their department, to use in their scholarship.

Within the Garden staff, research is mainly carried out by Beverley Glover, (Director), Tim Upson, (Deputy Director and curator) and Pete Atkinson (Plant Records Officer).
Recently, research projects using the Garden’s facilities have been carried out by staff and students of the University’s Departments of Archaeology, Architecture, Computer Science, Earth Sciences, Engineering, Geography, Plant Sciences, Zoology and the Sainsbury Laboratory. We have also provided opportunities for research to colleagues from Anglia Ruskin University, the John Innes Centre, Microsoft Research and other universities and research organisations. Studies on plants cover a wide spectrum of activities – biophysics, computational biology, developmental biology, ecology, genetics, molecular biology and physiology. The landscape of the Garden provides an important resource for students of architecture, while the animal life of the Garden can be readily studied in this protected and diverse environment.

We welcome the opportunity to collaborate with botanic gardens worldwide and other partner organisations in conservation, as well as with researchers from other universities, horticultural colleges, further education colleges and other research institutions. To discuss possible research collaborations, please contact the Director.

We operate a permit system to allow us to record the research conducted in the Garden. To apply for a permit please complete the Contact Form giving details.

Research in the Garden is organised into the following broad themes: plant evolution and systematics, conservation and sustainability, and supporting plant science